Mission Statement - De-Spinning the Pro-Taser Propaganda

Yeah right, 'Excited Delirium' my ass...

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The primary purpose of this blog is to provide an outlet for my observations and analysis about tasers, taser "associated" deaths, and the behaviour exhibited by the management, employees and minions of Taser International. In general, everything is linked back to external sources, often via previous posts on the same topic, so that readers can fact-check to their heart's content. This blog was started in late-2007 when Canadians were enraged by the taser death of Robert Dziekanski and four others in a short three month period. The cocky attitude exhibited by the Taser International spokespuppet, and his preposterous proposal that Mr. Dziekanski coincidentally died of "excited delirium" at the time of his taser-death, led me to choose the blog name I did and provides my motivation. I have zero financial ties to this issue.

Thursday, February 11, 2010

Eugene’s Civilian Review Board copies-and-pastes from Issac Azimov

Circa 1942, science fiction writer Isaac Asimov laid down the Three Laws of Robotics [wiki]:

1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
2. A robot must obey any orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.


Eugene, OR (KMTR) - For the first time since its formation, the City of Eugene’s Civilian Review Board has advised the chief of police to re-open an investigation. At a meeting Tuesday night, the board was discussing Taser incident involving a University of Oregon exchange student from China. The board disagrees with Police Chief Pete Kerns that an officer was justified in his use of force and use of a Taser. ...

Bernadette Conover, a board member, said the officers should have taken into account the language barrier as soon as they encountered the first student. "For me, the thing that kept coming up was ‘do no harm’. We want our officers, when they respond, to first do no harm, protect society and keep themselves safe. So there were an awful lot of things here that I think could have and should have been done differently." ...
[LINK]

1. first, do no harm...
2. protect society...
3. keep themselves safe...

Essentially the exact same three rules, and in the same order.

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