Mission Statement - De-Spinning the Pro-Taser Propaganda

Yeah right, 'Excited Delirium' my ass...

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The primary purpose of this blog is to provide an outlet for my observations and analysis about tasers, taser "associated" deaths, and the behaviour exhibited by the management, employees and minions of Taser International. In general, everything is linked back to external sources, often via previous posts on the same topic, so that readers can fact-check to their heart's content. This blog was started in late-2007 when Canadians were enraged by the taser death of Robert Dziekanski and four others in a short three month period. The cocky attitude exhibited by the Taser International spokespuppet, and his preposterous proposal that Mr. Dziekanski coincidentally died of "excited delirium" at the time of his taser-death, led me to choose the blog name I did and provides my motivation. I have zero financial ties to this issue.

Thursday, May 29, 2008

Taser used in (non)armed robbery

Earlier this month, I posted a thought experiment ('gedanken') about how criminals might use tasers to commit very serious crimes, and get away with significantly less punishment because the authorities defined the taser as non-lethal for their own purposes (and didn't think it all the way through to the unintended consequences). [LINK]

My example (above) was about a hypothetical taser (non)murder.

The following story is about a real-life taser (non)armed robbery.

St. Tammany News (Tuesday, May 27, 2008) - A St. Tammany Parish jury may have set a precedent this week when it comes to charging thieves armed with an electronic stun gun with armed robbery. Ten out of 12 jurors did not agree Tuesday that such a weapon causes “great bodily harm,” as required under Louisiana law to charge someone with armed robbery. Pearl River’s Gary Perez, 40, was instead convicted after two hours of jury deliberation with first-degree robbery for the 2005 convenience store hold up, a charge that carries a jail term at least 50 years less than armed robbery. ... [LINK]

I ended with:

Be careful what you wish for - you may actually get it.

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